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Johnson County

Research-based Information You Can Trust — Localized for your needs

Johnson County
11811 S. Sunset Drive
Suite 1500
Olathe, KS 66061

Office Hours:

Monday - Friday,
8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.



(913) 715-7000
(913) 715-7005 fax
jo@listserv.ksu.edu

Map to our office

Fish and Wildlife - Homeowner Associations

Most homeowner association ponds are not designed for fishing and wildlife because their primary purpose may have been stormwater management. Regardless of how a pond is built or managed however, animals will benefit from its presence. In fact, creatures such as frogs, salamanders, turtles and many birds may begin using a new pond immediately, while other wildlife come along later. If you are interested in learning more about fish and wildlife in a pond, check out the resources below.

Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks
Producing Fish and Wildlife from Kansas Ponds is a booklet that provides pond owners and anglers with information to effectively manage fish and wildlife resources associated with ponds. Fish and wildlife can be accommodated in a multi-purpose pond with minimal adverse effects on other uses. While it may be unfeasible to put all of these ideas into practice, pond owners and anglers should be aware of the potentials that exist for a pond that is built, developed, and managed, as outlined in this booklet. Fish and wildlife can contribute significantly to the quality of life in Kansas!

Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks / Johnson County

  • 8304 Hedge Lane Terrace
  • Shawnee, KS 66227
  • (913) 422-1314

Both a fisheries biologist and wildlife biologist are available to help with your pond management needs.

Canadian Geese Management
With the dramatic increase in Canadian goose populations, their presence can cause issues for water quality because of their droppings on lawns and sidewalks. A good resource includes the Internet Center for Wildlife Damage Management